Vital Lab Solutions

HealthySole Plus UVC Shoe Disinfectant
HealthySole Plus UVC Shoe Disinfectant
HealthySole Plus UVC Shoe Disinfectant
HealthySole Plus UVC Shoe Disinfectant
HealthySole Plus UVC Shoe Disinfectant

HEALTHYSOLE PLUS

HealthySole is the first clinically proven chemical free UVC shoe disinfectant device to kill up to 99.99% of exposed microorganisms such as bacterial and viral pathogens on the soles of shoes in 8 seconds. HealthySole® is also effective against fungi and bacterial spores that travel on shoe soles leading to the spread of infection via inhalation or horizontal translation from the surface and air contamination.

By adding a UVC shoe disinfectant station such as HealthySole Plus to an existing infection control program, the facility will decrease the overall microbial load starting with shoe and floor contamination. HealthySole® significantly decreases the aerosolizing, migration, or transfer of deadly pathogens that may lead to higher healthcare-associated infections (HAI) rates. HealthySole® is an active UVC shoe disinfectant germicidal system that reduces infectious organisms with virtually no workflow interruption, additional staff or monetary cost to operate.

1st Clinically-Tested UVC Product To Kill Germs On The Soles Of Shoe

  • 8-Second Kill Time
  • Up to 99% Kill Rate of Pathogens on the Sole of Shoes (including Covid-19)
  • Patented Design

1st Clinically-Tested UVC Shoe Disinfectant Station To Kill Germs On The Soles Of Shoe

Using the power of HealthySole Plus UVC shoe disinfectant system results in over 99% reduction in Coronavirus on soles of footwear.

HealthySole® is the first active germicidal and chemical-free UVC shoe disinfectant device used to kill and reduce up to 99.99% of exposed microorganisms on the soles of shoes in 8 seconds. HealthySole® utilizes proprietary high output, plasma stable UVC lamps, which have patented Plastic Encapsulation Technology™, making them shatter resistant, self-cleaning, and ETL listed.

HAI Transmission Through Shoe Soles

#1

Infectious pathogens are transmitted through three environmental routes: air, surface contact, and water. Main pathogen migration routes into healthcare facilities are through infected patients bodies or germs riding on clothing or shoes. Depending on the type of organism, it can remain a threat for days, even up to months. Organisms can live on any surface and be spread through aerosolization, inhalation, and direct contact with a contaminated surface. These deadly pathogens migrate from room to room with each step, travelling freely into all locations including OR’s, ICU’s, dialysis, wound care, labour and delivery, bone marrow transplant and other high-risk areas. (CDC and NIOSH Study)

#2

The use of chemical disinfectants on healthcare facility floors is an integral component in controlling HAI’s but does not keep the floors clean and safe for long. An investigation by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) proves that cleaning hospital floors using a phenolic disinfectant causes a 90% to 99.9% reduction of bacteria. However, the CDC notes within a few hours of disinfection the bacterial count on these floors can be equal to, or higher, than the pre-treatment levels. The pathogenic recontamination begins immediately after disinfection. Due to their microscopic size, bacteria, viruses, mold, and spores become airborne and can remain a suspended inhalation hazard for hours.

#3

According to the CDC, “hospital floors become contaminated with microorganisms from settling airborne bacteria by contact with shoes, wheels and other objects. Even with chemical disinfectant applied to a floor being 94-99% effective in the reduction of organisms, the same surface, after testing, has been shown to have bacterial counts back to the pretreatment levels in just a few hours.” (CDC Guidelines for Disinfection and Sterilization in Healthcare Facilities, 2008).
This is why UVC shoe disinfectant is so important to reduce HAI’s.

HEALTHYSOLE UVC SHOE DISINFECTANT CLINICAL STUDIES

Peer review publication: Journal of Hospital Infection

T. Rashid, K. Poblete, J. Amadio, I. Hasan, K. Begum, M.J. Alam, K.W. Garey

University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA

A UVC decontamination device (HealthySole Plus UVC shoe disinfectant system) was shown to reduce the amount of four (4) relevant pathogenic organisms from shoe soles with subsequent decreased colonization of floors, healthcare equipment, furniture, beds and a patient dummy.

See Full Paper

Poster presentation American Academy of Pediatrics Meeting (Tennessee Chapter: October 2019)

William Gaylord MD, Jennifer Keates-Baleeiro MD, David Levine PhD, June Hanks PhD, Henry Spratt PhD

University of Tennessee College of Medicine Chattanooga – Department of Pediatric Hematology/Oncology/Erlanger Children’s Hospital

Controlled prospective study revealed that use of HealthySole Plus (UVC exposure to footwear) alone resulted in a statistically significant -28% reduction in C. difficile present by bathroom sinks and return air ducts. Authors conclude that this might indicate reduced aerosolization of C difficile spores in rooms, which would indicate critical reduction of these spores throughout the rooms.

A UVC decontamination device (HealthySole Plus) was shown to reduce the amount of four (4) relevant pathogenic organisms from shoe soles with subsequent decreased colonization of floors, healthcare equipment, furniture, beds and a patient dummy.

See Full Paper

Microchem Laboratories (Round Rock, Texas)

Independent third-party triple replicate testing of HealthySole Plus UVC shoe disinfectant system using 6 common HAI-causing pathogens demonstrates a single cycle kill rate of up to 99.994% (4.20 log) reduction of bacteria.

See Full Paper

Frank Mascarich, B.S. CSE Independent third-party testing of UVC light energy exposure from the HealthySole Plus UVC shoe disinfectant system shows a 97+% UVC light energy exposure rate to the soles of footwear on the patented HealthySole Plus grating design. See Full Paper

SHOE SOLE CONTAMINATION STUDIES

Peer Reviewed Publication: Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology

Sreelatha Koganti, Heba Alhmidi, Myreen E. Tomas, Jennifer L. Cadnum, Annette Jencson and Curtis J. Donskey

Evaluation of Hospital Floors as a Potential Source of Pathogen Dissemination Using a Nonpathogenic Virus as a Surrogate Marker. Infection Control & Hospital Epidemiology, Available on CJO 2016 doi:10.1017/ice.2016.181.

Researchers determined rapid natural pathogenic migration in a hospital setting. In this study they used bacteriophage MS2, a nonpathogenic, nonenveloped RNA virus, to examine the potential for dissemination of microorganisms from floors of isolation rooms to the hands of patients and to high-touch surfaces inside and outside of rooms.

See Full Paper

Peer Reviewed Publication: Journal of Applied Microbiology

T. Rashid, H.M. VonVille, I. Hasan and K.W. Garey

University of Houston College of Pharmacy, Houston, TX, USA

Systematic review of published literature determined that string clinical evidence exists that shoe soles are vectors for infectious diseases and that the prevalence of infectious agents on shoe bottoms is well-documented in literature. Authors point to possible decontamination strategies

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Katarzyna Paduszyńska, LudmiŁA Gagis, Monika Rucińska, Lech Pomorski

Department of General and Oncological Surgery, University Hospital and Educational Centre of Medical University in Łódź and Department of Laboratory Diagnostics Provincial Specialist Hospital in Zgierz, Poland

This study was designed to assess the degree of risk of bacterial transmission from physician to patient through hands, equipment and enclosing surfaces (shoe soles). Physicians are important factor of bacterial transmission in hospital. Hands, stethoscopes and particularly soles of shoes of medical staff are shown to be the primary sources of infection.

See Full Paper

Peer Reviewed Publication: American Journal of Infection Control

Meena Agarwal, MBBS, DIP.UROL, PhD, FRCS (UROL)a,b Peter Hamilton-Stewart, MBBS, FRCS, FRCSEda, Ronald A. Dixon, MSc, PhDb

Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK

Dirty operating room boots, often contaminated with blood and other infected material, are not only a source of discontent among surgeons and other surgical personnel, but they also pose a potential risk of transmission of viral or bacterial diseases to the wearer and cleaner of the boots.

See Full Paper

FLOOR, AIR, SURFACE AND ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINATION STUDIES

Peer Reviewed Publication: Clinical Microbiology and Infection

C. difficile carriers’ rooms are as contaminated as those of patients with active CDI and significantly more than those of non-carriers. Contamination Distribution among the various sites tested: The most contaminated 181 sites in patient’s environment were the floors with 19 (27%) positive samples of 182 floors from carrier rooms and 7 (23%) in the CDI group. Even the very rare 183 contamination we observed in non-carriers was of the floor. The bathroom floors 184 were also highly contaminated, with 15 (21%) of the carriers’ rooms and in 5 (16%) of 185 the CDI patients’ rooms.

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Curtis J. Donskey MD

Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Louis Stokes Cleveland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, Cleveland, OH

Efforts to improve environmental cleaning and disinfection typically focus primarily on high-touch surfaces in patient rooms. This review highlights evidence that portable equipment and other shared devices and floors may be underappreciated as sources of dissemination of health care−associated pathogens. Practical approaches to address these sites of contamination are emphasized.

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Annette Erichsen Andersson RN, Ingrid Bergh RN, PhDc, Jón Karlsson MD, PhD Bengt Eriksson MD, PhD, Kerstin Nilsson RN, PhD

Institute of Health and Care Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden b Department of Anesthesia, Surgery and Intensive Care, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden c School of Life Sciences, University of Skövde, Skövde, Sweden Department of Orthopedics, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden Institute of Clinical Sciences, Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden

See Full Paper

Peer Reviewed Publication: American Journal of Infection Control

Meena Agarwal, MBBS, DIP.UROL, PhD, FRCS (UROL)a,b Peter Hamilton-Stewart, MBBS, FRCS, FRCSEda, Ronald A. Dixon, MSc, PhDb

Bradford, West Yorkshire, UK

Dirty operating room boots, often contaminated with blood and other infected material, are not only a source of discontent among surgeons and other surgical personnel, but they also pose a potential risk of transmission of viral or bacterial diseases to the wearer and cleaner of the boots.

See Full Paper

We also offer HealthySole Home for residential uses

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